Source UNJLC
Theme
Countries Pakistan
Document type Other
Publication date 17/10/2005

UNJLC Pakistan Earthquake
BULLETIN No. 19 (Day 44)
As of 1800 hours local, Monday, November 21st, 2005

UNJLC Bulletins aim to provide a clear and concise regular overview of the situation as it exists in the earthquake-affected area of Pakistan and contiguous areas with regards to logistics matters affecting relief work by the humanitarian community. They focus on practical issues that affect the welfare of the afflicted populace and related humanitarian work such as the status of transport routes for humanitarian supplies and personnel into the area, relevant administrative or commercial developments, air (including strategic airlift and helicopter operations), Customs and immigration matters, and availability of accommodation and fuels. They further seek to identify major issues for the humanitarian community and other interested parties, to provide relevant background and constructive recommendations on current issues, and to alert responsible parties to emerging issues. This bulletin was produced daily from October 17th – 22nd. As the emergency matured, it was then produced thrice-weekly, on Mondays. Wednesdays and Fridays until November 18th. Unless public demand dictates otherwise it will now be produced twice-weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays to allow resources to be redirected to stand-alone products.

Summary and Highlights

  • The Winter Sustainment Plan is nearing finalisation. A “roadshow” to inform actors in the field, and to gain their comments and commitment, now complete.
  • The aviation fuels situation, a vital element of optimised helicopter operations, has improved with the commissioning of a US military fuels facility at Muzaffarabad and the arrival of a larger French NATO facility at Abbottabad. Further facilities may be installed at Chatter Plain.
  • The cargo capacity of the deployed helicopter fleet is largely unchanged but will reduce by the end of the week as some foreign military aircraft are withdrawn and not entirely compensated for by more incoming machines. 

Contents
1.    Winter Sustainment Planning
2.    Winter Sleeping Bags For NGO’s: DFID
3.    Air Issues: Muzaffarabad
4.    Field Co-ordination: Mansehra
5.    Fuels Issues: Aviation and Ground
6.    Rotary Wing Aircraft: Weekly Overview

1.    Winter Sustainment Planning

The UNJLC Plans Team has been conducting a “roadshow” of the Winter Sustainment Plan (see Bulletin 15 (item 1) and 17 (item 3) of November 11th and 16th respectively). This plan draws from existing plans of agencies and the Pakistan government and military, integrating them. Covering the major logistical hubs, the purpose of the visits was to inform actors in the field of the plan, and to obtain direct feedback and commitments to run the Forward Area Support Sites (FASS’s), so vital to the plan’s success.

Substantial support for the plan is already in place in the form of interagency storage assets, particularly in Chatter Plain and Banna in the Alai Valley. Other WFP support is extended in Muzaffarabad, with the plan largely dependent on helicopters chartered through UNHAS.

The team will be completing their mission late this week. Briefings on the plan are available from the UNJLC offices in Islamabad and in the field.

2.    Winter Sleeping Bags For NGO’s: DFID

The UK’s DFID has about 50 high-quality sleeping bags, suitable for winter conditions, available free to approved NGO’s on a first-come-first-served basis.

3.    Air Issues: Muzaffarabad

Air Safety: The concern over the safety of air operations at the crowded Muzaffarabad airfield (see Bulletin 17 of November 16th, item 2) has abated in recent days as a slot system has been instituted and as the Joint Air Operations Centre (JAOC), grouping together all helicopter operators, has developed. Parties who temporarily suspended air operations at the airfield have now resumed flights. All parties flying in the area will now need to co-ordinate their activities through the JOAC.

DFID Chinook Operation: The six-day operation by DFID-funded Royal Air Force Chinook to carry relief supplies forward from Muzaffarabad is progressing well with in excess of 800 tonnes safely and successfully carried.

These aircraft are redeploying later this week with the last flight in theatre on Friday, November 25th, with only one of the three aircraft. They have been operational for 28 days and transported in excess of 1,000 tonnes.

4.    Field Co-ordination: Mansehra

The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) in Mansehra has available ten trucks of eight to ten tonnes capacity for movement of cargo in the area.

 A number of 4x4 pick-ups are also available for use in the Khaghan Valley. About fifteen of these are dedicated to assisting the Pakistani Army with its humanitarian operations but spare capacity is available to agencies.

Contact Ms. Mary Giudine, telephone 0300 852-6533, or e-mail mgiudice@iom.int

5.    Fuels Issues: Aviation and Ground

The forward availability of fuels is a key element in optimising the operational effectiveness of the deployed helicopter fleet. To date, there have been insufficient fuels forward across the affected area to achieve this. The Pakistani military has its own fuel, often in drums, at most locations. Although NGO operators with small fleets may use this, and process it through their own filtering systems first, it is not generally used by the broader humanitarian community.

  • At Muzaffarabad, the agencies have been drawing aviation fuels from the Pakistan State Oil Company (PSO), which has several bowsers on site. To improve the fuels situation, the US military has installed a 600,000 litre fuel farm at Muzaffarabad. Humanitarian air operators may be able to buy from this.
  • At Abbottabad, NATO, through France, is installing a 1.2 million litre facility that should be operational by November 24th. UNHAS has one bowser and a 50,000-litre PSO tanker truck on site, and the ICRC has two bowsers.

An aviation fuel facility is likely to be installed at Chatter Plain, south of and servicing Balakot, with at least fuel tanker trucks. Further details will be disseminated when they are confirmed.
Much of the humanitarian aviation fuel used in the affected area comes from Peshawar, with a constant cycle of tanker trucks. The roads these trucks use are likely to remain open during the winter. There appears to be adequate supply in the country, assisted in part by a ban by the Government on exporting fuels, including to neighbouring Afghanistan.

There are no other major aviation fuel facilities in forward areas. PSO, Shell and other retailers seem to have an extensive network for ground fuels throughout the region and appear to be able to resupply most areas. However, in places such as Muzaffarabad, the Army has been providing Diesel.

6.    Rotary Wing Aircraft: Weekly Overview

The number of deployed helicopters has increased by only two over the past week but the cargo capacity has  increased by almost 10% with two more NATO CH-53’s operational under UNHAS tasking and one more ICRC Mi-26. The fleet will reduce later in the week with the withdrawal on completion of their mission of the three RAF CH-47 Chinooks, provided by DFID and tasked by UNJLC and UNHAS, together with Japan’s contribution.

Two of the four Royal Australian Air Force helicopters being deployed will replace two similar MH-60 machines that the US military is redeploying.
 

As of Nov 21st

Number of aircraft

Cargo Capacity, tonnes

 

Aircraft Type

Nov 21st

Nov 14th

Nov 21st

Nov 14th

Comments

UNHAS Tasked Assets:

Mi-8 MTV/T

13

13

48.75

48.75

Up to a further eight Mi-8’s possible.

Mi-26T Note 1

2

2

36.00

36.00

Up to a further three Mi-26’s possible.

CH-47 Chinook

3

3

18.00

18.00

UK DFID through Royal Air Force, to Nov. 25th

CH-53

4

2

48.00

24.00

NATO, German military, probably to mid-January

Sub-total

22

20

150.75

126.75

 

Government of Pakistan Assets:

Mi-17

13

13

48.75

48.75

Pakistani Government assets are deployed both in the forward field locations and from Chaklala Air Force Base in Islamabad. Serviceability rate is thought to be generally low after intensive use over the first month of the emergency response.

Bell 412

13

13

26.00

26.00

H-3 Sea King

2

2

6.00

6.00

UH-2H

4

4

8.00

8.00

Alouette –III

4

4

16.00

16.00

Sub-total

36

36

104.75

104.75

 

Foreign Government and Foreign Military Assets in Support of the Pakistani Government:

Mi-8 MTV

2

2

7.50

7.50

US Government

UH-60/MH-60

2

4

6.00

12.00

US Military. The two MH-60 Seahawks have departed. However four Australian RAAF UH-60s will soon be joining the operation.

UH-2

5

5

10.00

10.00

CH-47 – Chinook

21

21

126.00

126.00

Bell 412

3

3

6.00

6.00

Japanese Self Defence Forces. Departing now.

MD 900

1

1

-

-

SAR Helicopter - Luxembourg through NATO

Sub-total

34

36

155.50

161.50

 

Other:

Mi-8 MTV

1

1

3.75

3.75

Operated by OXFAM

Mi-8 MTV

5

5

18.75

18.75

Operated by ICRC

SA-330 Puma

2

2

6.00

6.00

AS-332 Spr Puma

1

-

3.00

-

Mi-26T

1

-

18.00

-

Augusta 139 Note 2

2

2

5.50

4.00

Operated by Agha Khan Rural Programme

AS-350 Squirrel

2

2

0.50

0.50

Operated by AirServ for MSF Holland

Sub-total

14

12

55.50

33.00

 

Overall Total

106

104

466.50

426.00

 

Note 1: Additional UNHAS Mi-8’s and particularly Mi-26’s are dependent on donor funding.
Note 2: Agha Khan were previously listed as operating two Bell 412’s. These were replaced by two Augusta 139’s.

                                BULLETIN ENDS