Source UNJLC
Theme
Countries Pakistan
Document type Other

UNJLC Pakistan Earthquake
BULLETIN No. 16 (Day 37)
As of 1800 hours local, Monday, November 14th, 2005

UNJLC Bulletins aim to provide a clear and concise regular overview of the situation as it exists in the earthquake-affected area of Pakistan and contiguous areas with regards to logistics matters affecting relief work by the humanitarian community. They focus on practical issues that affect the welfare of the afflicted populace and related humanitarian work such as the status of transport routes for humanitarian supplies and personnel into the area, relevant administrative or commercial developments, air (including strategic airlift and helicopter operations), Customs and immigration matters, and availability of accommodation and fuels. They further seek to identify major issues for the humanitarian community and other interested parties, to provide relevant background and constructive recommendations on current issues, and to alert responsible parties to emerging issues. This bulletin was produced daily from October 17th – 22nd but as the emergency has matured is now produced on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, until further notice.

Summary and Highlights

  • The Pakistan Government entity responsible for issuing the No Objection Certificate to allow Customs exempt importation of humanitarian goods has been changed. Teething problems with the new arrangement are causing delays in obtaining the exemptions but UNJLC is working to solve these.
  • A third of five crossings from India on the Line of Control has been opened but this area has not yet developed into a viable logistical alternative.
  • Nominal cargo capacity of the deployed helicopter fleet is unchanged. It is likely to reduce as some militaries remove their aircraft in the coming weeks, but this may be offset with more incoming machines. 

Contents
1.    Customs Exemptions and Procedures
2.    Field Co-ordination: Mansehra
3.    Eastern Access: Line of Control
4.    Karachi Port Information
5.    Rotary Wing Aircraft: Overview

1.    Customs Exemptions and Procedures

Pakistan’s Central Board of Revenue (CBR) has extended the current tax exempt status - including Customs duty and sales tax -  for earthquake relief goods for a total period of up to three months. The initial exemption period was for one month.

In a separate but related development, as prefaced in Bulletin 14 of November 9th, item 5, the Government entity responsible for issuing the No Objection Certificate (NOC) necessary for UN agencies and NGO’s to obtain this exemption has changed from the Federal Relief Commission to the Emergency Relief Cell (ERC) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. With immediate effect, consignments for UN agencies, IOs, NGOs, and individuals will be certified and cleared by the ERC, within the Cabinet Division, instead of the Federal Relief Commission (FRC).

The new procedures seem to have produced delays as having the NOC issued is now a less streamlined process than it was with the FRC. In particular, the ERC requires the original airway bill, something not available until an aircraft has landed. UNJLC is liaising with the ERC to resolve this.

Procedures as they exist are published on www.unjlc.org/pakistan. Further clarification on the specific procedure will be disseminated via the regular logistics cluster meetings, UNJLC bulletin mailing list. 

2.    Field Co-ordination: Mansehra

World Vision International is currently cooperating with Partner Aid International (PAI) by providing storage capacity for shelter material in Mansehra. Over the coming months, PAI plans to distribute 1000 family shelters in the Allai Valley area. Swiss Humanitarian Aid (SHA), together with its local partners is finalizing its distribution of tents in Jarod, within the Manoor Valley to the north-east of Batagram. The next stage of the programme will see the procurement of 10,000 shelter kits subject to availability. SHA noted that the cost of procuring corrugated sheets in Karachi has risen by a third from Rs.290 to Rs.390 per sheet in the last week.

UNHCR has also established a large warehouse in Mansehra and will erect an additional two Rubbhalls.

In nearby Ghari Habibullah, WFP has made available two Rubbhalls on an interagency basis for NFI storage. WFP will provide security at the facilities but agencies using the facilities must maintain their own stock control and inventory arrangements.

UNJLC encourages agencies to continue to volunteer information on their NFI pipelines and procurement plans so that an assessment of transport and storage requirements can be developed for the area.

In addition to UN, NGO and foreign military assets operating out of Mansehra, the Pakistani military is flying four Bell 412’s, two to three UH-2’s and five Mi-17’s from the Mansehra forward base. Agencies in the field may request access to these assets by contacting the local Pakistani Army Liaison Officer.

Road access to the area remains adequate with regular resupply from the main base of Abbottabad. 

3.    Eastern Access: Line of Control

On November 12th, Pakistan and India opened a third of five agreed crossing points along the Kashmir Line of Control. This crossing, at Tithwal-Nauseri, is the northernmost of the five and closest to Muzaffarabad.

As with the previous two crossing points (see Bulletins 12 and 14), only the transfer of relief supplies is permitted. Civilians are not yet allowed to cross. The crossing is reportedly open for four hours each day.

UNJLC will attempt to monitor the customs and protocol situation of these access points. Given the political context and distance from major supply hubs in India, it is not yet recommended that agencies develop logistical plans that may be overly dependant on these crossings.

4.    Karachi Port

As sealift replaces air as the most important mode of strategic transport, Pakistan’s main port of Karachi, about 1580 km from Islamabad, will become a more significant element of humanitarian logistics. The ports are connected to Rawalpindi and Islamabad by road and rail. There are mixed reports about the usefulness of rail.

There are four main sea terminals in or near Karachi: Karachi International Container Terminal; Pakistan International Container Terminal; Karachi Port Trust; and Qasim International Container Terminal. The first three are within Karachi and the fourth is about 50km to the east.

Qasim is the most likely port of entry for humanitarian supplies. Once a vessel arrives, the port authorities allow approximately seven days grace to unload before levying additional charges. UNJLC will attempt to monitor the flow of relief items as part of its NFI pipeline tracking programme and identify potential bottlenecks. Should a full port assessment be undertaken, UNJLC will also provide additional information on Customs procedures.

5.    Rotary Wing Aircraft: Overview

The deployed helicopter fleet increased marginally during the past week by three with nominal cargo capacity generally constant. Whilst the UN cargo capacity has increased slightly, operational assets of other groups have decreased slightly or remained static.

Luxembourg has also deployed a civilian Search and Rescue helicopter through NATO. Whilst it lacks significant cargo capability, it can be requested for reconnaissance trips can be made. Australia is also understood to be deploying four helicopters shortly.

The ICRC will be deploying further assets this week. Two US military CH-53 Super Stallions departed on the 11th November but this will be offset overall once all four of the German CH-53’s become operational over the coming week.
 
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As of Nov 14th

Number of aircraft

Cargo Capacity, tonnes

 

Aircraft Type

14th Nov

7th Nov

14th Nov

7th Nov

Comments

UNHAS Tasked Assets:

Mi-8 MTV/T

13

12

48.75

45.00

Up to a further eight Mi-8’s possible.

Mi-26T Note 1

2

2

36.00

36.00

Up to a further three Mi-26’s possible.

CH-47 Chinook

3

3

18.00

18.00

UK DFID through Royal Air Force, to late November

CH-53

2

2

24.00

24.00

NATO, German military, probably to mid-January

Sub-total

20

19

126.75

123.00

 

Government of Pakistan Assets:

Mi-17

13

13

48.75

48.75

Pakistani Government assets are deployed both in the forward field locations and from Chaklala Air Force Base in Islamabad. Serviceability rate is thought to be generally low after intensive use over the first month of the emergency response.

Bell 412

13

13

26.00

26.00

H-3 Sea King

2

2

6.00

6.00

UH-2H

4

4

8.00

8.00

Alouette –III

4

4

16.00

16.00

Sub-total

36

36

104.75

104.75

 

Foreign Government and Foreign Military Assets in Support of the Pakistani Government:

Mi-8 MTV

2

2

7.50

7.50

US Government

UH-60/MH-60

4

5

12.00

15.00

US Military. Two each UH-60 Blackhawk and MH-60 Seahawk. The Seahawks may depart this coming week. Several Chinooks may be rotating out.

UH-2

5

5

10.00

10.00

CH-47 – Chinook

21

17

126.00

102.00

CH-53

0

2

0.00

24.00

US Military. Departed 11 November 2005

Bell 412

3

3

6.00

6.00

Japanese Self Defence Forces

MD 900

1

0

-

-

SAR Helicopter - Luxembourg through NATO

Sub-total

36

34

161.50

164.50

 

Other:

Mi-8 MTV

1

1

3.75

3.75

Operated by OXFAM

Mi-8 MTV Note 2

5

5

18.75

18.75

Operated by ICRC

SA-330 Puma

2

2

6.00

6.00

Bell 412

2

2

4.00

4.00

Operated by Agha Khan Rural Programme

AS-350 Squirrel

2

2

0.50

0.50

Operated by AirServ for MSF Holland

Sub-total

12

12

33.00

33.00

 

Overall Total

104

101

426.00

425.25

 

Note 1: Additional UNHAS Mi-8’s and particularly Mi-26’s are dependent on donor funding.

Note 2: Bulletin No. 13 incorrectly reported six ICRC deployed Mi-8’s. Correct total is five.

BULLETIN ENDS